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Facts, figures and performance

Facts and figures

We are continuing to focus on helping people meet their needs in a way that gives them choice and control and connects them with their local community. This means that people can expect services tailored to their own needs to achieve the outcomes that are important to them.

Some of the figures in this report are snapshots as at 31 March 2015 compared with the position as at 31 March 2014. Those are directly comparable figures.

Our customer service centre is the first point of contact for most people, including those referred on to us by other agencies. We signpost people to a social care assessment or the best services to meet their needs. In 2014/15, 34,434 people contacted us with social care enquiries (33,565 in 2013/14).

Referrals to social care

7109 referrals for social care and related issues (7,141 in 2013/14), many of which were dealt with by providing simple services, advice and information.

814 people had a ‘self-assessment’ (858 in 2013/14) resulting in 479 receiving appropriate support guidance or awaiting further action (195 in 2013/14). The remaining 335 went on to a full assessment (663 in 2013/14).

4,263 (4,381 in 2013/14) people in total (including existing clients) had a full assessment undertaken following social referrals, reviews, carers assessments and services.

The total number of assessments for these clients in 2014-15 was 6,591 (7,360 in 2013/14)

Reviews, carers’ assessments and services

Between 1 April 2014 and 31 March 2015:

2,867 reviews were completed for service users (3,653 in 2013/14).

596 carers had an assessment or review completed (436 in 2013/14).

3,314 people were receiving a service (3,129 long term service and 185 short term service) at 31 March 2015 (4,512 as at 31 March 2014). This shows more people receiving short term services with a decreasing number of people receiving services to meet long term needs.

Of those receiving a service, those defined as receiving ‘self-directed support’ (they were provided with a budget and were able to decide how they would like to spend their money in order to provide the support they needed) as at 31 March 2015 was 2,459 (2,963 in 2013/14). The reduction has come about following clarification of the definition of “managed by the local authority” which all local authorities will have received in September 2014.

Of those service users and carers receiving self-directed support, the total number of people in receipt of direct payments during 2013-14 was 1,087.  At 31 March 2015 there were 626 service users in receipt of direct payments and 531 carers who have so far received a direct payment. (Note: The number of direct payments to service users is a “snap-shot” as at 31 March 2015 whilst for carers it is cumulative from April 2014 –March 2015).

2,815 people were receiving community based services, including home care and day care (3,338 in 2013/14).

337 people were permanently admitted to local authority funded residential and nursing home care placements (400 in 2013/14). 152 of these were admissions to residential care (189 in 2013/14) and 185 were admissions to nursing care (211 in 2013/14). Overall, 947 people were funded in residential and nursing care according to a snapshot taken on 31 March 2015 (1,006 as at 31 March 2014).

901 people received home care in an average week (959 in 2013/14).

37 percent (333) of clients receiving visits received ‘intensive home care’ (10 or more hours per week) (34.2 percent (328 clients in 2013/14).

271 service users aged 55+ living in Extra Care Housing (265 in 2013/14). These are cumulative figures of all people who lived in Extra Care Housing for all or part of the period during 2014-15.

240 service users living in the community in other forms of supported living (255 in 2013/14) (188 with a learning difficulty, (202 in 2013/14)). These are cumulative figures of all people who lived in supported living for all or part of the period during 2014-15.

1,804 people were provided with additional support to remain in their own homes through aids and adaptations (1,940 in 2013/14).

5.1 percent of service users (133 people) aged 18-64 are from minority ethnic communities (5.19 percent in 2013/14).

1.9 percent of service users (61 people) aged 65 or over are from minority ethnic communities (2.35 percent in 2013/14).

Senior Series Dinner Time

Performance

A range of social care-related performance measures show how the services we provide compare to other authorities, and whether they are meeting the needs of the community. Some of the measures recognise how we work across health and social care to meet individuals’ needs.

Here are some of the performance measures included in the Government’s Adult Social Care Outcomes Framework. Our 2014/15 performance is compared with national figures for 2013/14 as these are the latest available.

Using a new national definition, the percentage of adults with self-directed support was 81.8 percent as at 31 March 2015 (whilst no direct comparison is possible, last year’s figure under the old definition was 88.3 percent as at 31 March 2014. This included both adults and carers). National (2013/14)   self-direct support (adults and carers) 61.9 percent.

The percentage of adults receiving a direct payment is 28.1 percent (27.7 percent at 31 March 2014). National (2013/14) direct payment (adults and carers) 19.1 percent.

The percentage of older people discharged from hospital who received reablement or rehabilitation care services and who are still at home 91 days after discharge from hospital is another key performance measure. This looks at the effectiveness of services which aim to improve older people’s independence when they have been discharged from hospital. Our 2013/14 performance showed that 89 percent (155 people) were still at home. The figures for 2014-15 is 85.8 percent. National (2013/14) 82.5 percent.

The percentage of adults with learning disabilities receiving social care services who were in paid employment at the time of their review was 8.6 percent (61 people) (12.4 percent in 2013/14). National (2013/14) 6.7 percent.

As at 31 March 2015, the percentage of adults (18-64) with learning disabilities receiving social care services who were in settled accommodation at the time of their review was 66 percent (474 out of 713 adults known to council) (71 percent, 540 out of 761 adults known to the council as at 31 March 2014). National (2013/14) 74.9 percent.

The percentage of adults with mental health problems receiving secondary mental health services who were in paid employment measures employment outcomes for those adults in touch with secondary mental health services whose complex needs are being managed using the Care Programme Approach (CPA). As at 31 March 2015, 21.6 percent of adults (135 people) using the CPA in South Gloucestershire were in paid employment (17.5 percent in 2013/14). National (2013/14) 7.0 percent.

The percentage of adults with Mental Health problems receiving secondary mental health services who were in settled accommodation at the time of their review measures the accommodation situation for adults in touch with secondary mental health services whose complex needs are being managed using the Care Programme Approach (CPA). As at 31 March 2015 82.2 percent (86.7 percent in 2013/14) in South Gloucestershire were in accommodation classed as ‘settled’. National (2013/14) 60.8 percent.

The number of hospital discharges that were delayed by social services for people aged 18 or over (per 100,000 population) measure aims for as few delayed discharges as possible. In 2014/15 adult social care was responsible for an average of 9.8 delayed patients ‘bed-days’ per 100,000 population for all discharges (6.0 in 2013/14). The main cause of this change has been delays in completing assessments and other processes to allow people to move to available commissioned services. Although a contributory factor has been the occasional shortage of nursing care beds for people with dementia, this was a particular issue during autumn 2014. National (2013/14) 3.1 percent.

Permanent admissions to residential/nursing care for older people (per 100,000 population). It is better to have a low rate of permanent admissions to residential care, as a high rate can indicate a lack in the range of health and social care community services needed to enable someone to remain in their own home and/or a need for improved assessments and decision making processes. In 2014/15 South Gloucestershire had an admissions rate to residential/nursing care for older people of 680 per 100,000 population (772 in 2013/14) and 5.5 per 100,000 for the population aged 18-64 (17.1 in 2013/14). National (2013/14) 651 and 14.4.