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Tytherington Conservation Area

Introduction

A conservation area is an area of ‘special architectural or historic interest, the character or appearance of which it is desirable to preserve or enhance’. Once designated, the local planning authority has a statutory duty to ensure that any proposed development will preserve or enhance the character or appearance of the conservation area and its setting.

Tytherington was designated a conservation area in July 1975. A Supplementary Planning Document (SPD) appraisal leaflet was published following the conservation areas designation. This document is not a review of such, but sets out the information as produced in an accessible format supported by current policy context, pictures and mapping.

Policy context

Local authorities have had the ability to designate locations of ‘special architectural or historic interest’ as conservation areas since 1967 when introduced as part of the Civic Amenities Act. Section 69 (2) of the Planning (Listed Building and Conservation) Act 1990 legislates that authorities are to carry out reviews of existing conservation areas from ‘time to time’. Section 72 also states that ‘special attention shall be paid to the desirability of preserving or enhancing the character or appearance of that area’. Guidance on conservation area appraisals and the management of conservation areas is produced by Heritage England.

The National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF) sets out national planning policy and must be taken into account in the preparation of local and neighbourhood plans, and is a material consideration in planning decisions. The NPPF defines conservation areas as ‘Heritage Assets’ and sets out in Para 126 that local authorities should ‘recognise that heritage assets are an irreplaceable resource and should conserve them in a manner appropriate to their significance’. Para 127 states that when designating conservation areas local planning authorities should ensure the area justifies this status because of its special architectural or historic interest.
South Gloucestershire has 31 conservation areas, and there are a number of policies within the Council’s Local Plan documents that are relevant. South Gloucestershire Local Plan 2006 saved policy L12 requires development within or affecting the conservation area to preserve or enhance its character or appearance. Further to this policy L13 states that development affecting the setting of a Listed Building will not be permitted unless ‘the building and its setting would be preserved’. South Gloucestershire Core Strategy 2006-2027 sets out in CS9 that the ‘natural and historic environment is a finite and irreplaceable resource’, and expects that new development will conserve, respect and enhance heritage assets.

The emerging Polices, Sites and Places (PSP) Plan policy PSP18 states that development should ‘serve to protect, and where appropriate, enhance or better reveal the significance of heritage assets and their setting’ and ‘development within their [listed buildings] setting will be expected to preserve and, where appropriate enhance…their special architectural or historic interest’. It should be noted the PSP Plan is currently a material consideration and at this time very limited weight is given to policies.

Setting

Tytherington is situated two miles south-east of Thornbury at the foot of Stowell Hill which forms part of the dramatic limestone escarpment of the Hallen-Wickwar ridge. The village lies at the junction of five roads and a tributary of the Ladden Brook passes through the south east side of the village.

History

Tytherington’s historic economy lies in agricultural and its associated industries, particularly cloth making and malting. The Church of St James (grade II Listed, see figure 1) has Norman origins, the Monks of Llanthony Abbey in Gloucester being its founders, although the existing church is largely 13th century and 15th century with 19th century restoration. The church indicates early settlement of the area although Boyts Farm (grade II Listed, see figure 2) dating from the late 16th century, is the oldest non-ecclesiastical building within the village. The Llanthony Abbey monks established a grange. Tithes from the Church and produce from the grange went to the Abbey in Gloucester. The 17th century grange (grade II Listed, see figure 3) to the east of the Church is on the site of the original grange.

Figure 1. Church of St James

Figure 1. Church of St James

Figure 2: Boyts Farm from Baden Hill Road

Figure 2: Boyts Farm from Baden Hill Road

Figure 3: The Grange from Baden Hill Road

Figure 3: The Grange from Baden Hill Road

The Swan Inn (grade II Listed, see figure 4) formally a house and Porch House (grade II Listed, see figure 5) are also of substantial size indicating the village was a reasonably prosperous agricultural centre. Cloth making would have been an important industry in common with most rural settlements in the area during the medieval period. This would have been produced by weavers as a cottage industry and would probably have been sold for the Bristol or London markets in Thornbury, the nearest medieval market town. Malt Cottages (see figure 6) and Malt House (see figure 7) in Duck Street suggest that malt used in beer making was produced locally either for local consumption or trade.
Figure 4: The Swan Inn

Figure 4: The Swan Inn

Figure 5: Porch House

Figure 5: Porch House

Figure 6: Malt Cottages.

Figure 6: Malt Cottages.

Tytherington is widely known for its quarries of limestone. The industry brought prosperity to the village and early quarrying activity for building stone is clearly evident with a number of disused quarries within the village. The demand for stone increased considerably during the 1870s as farming was beginning to decline and quarrying sustained the economy until recent times. Today, although building stone is no longer produced, the large scale operation at Grovesend Quarry just outside Tytherington produces limestone for aggregates.
Figure 7: Malt House.

Figure 7: Malt House.

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Circa 1880 Ordnance Survey map Tytherington

Circa 1880 Ordnance Survey map Tytherington

Character

The location of Tytherington at the base of the impressive escarpment provides Tytherington with an impressive backdrop of wooded slopes to the north whilst vistas of open fields to the south (see figure 9) place the village within its rural setting.

Figure 8: Wooded slopes to the North East of the village looking north from New Road

Figure 8: Wooded slopes to the North East of the village looking north from New Road

Figure 9: Views of open fields from Baden Hill Road looking south

Figure 9: Views of open fields from Baden Hill Road looking south

The settlement pattern of the village takes its form from the radial roads (see figures 10 and 11, its centre being at the confluence of these roads with the church and Swan inn forming dominant structures at this point. Development becomes more dispersed along the routes out of the village with individual cottages and houses spaced out within their individual plots, the more recent buildings interspersed amongst the older stone built houses and cottages.
Figure 10: View over the centre of the village looking west from the church.

Figure 10: View over the centre of the village looking west from the church.

Figure 11: Looking South over the centre of the village towards the playing fields

Figure 11: Looking South over the centre of the village towards the playing fields

The church is a large imposing building well sited within its garden and with a backdrop of mature trees on the wooded escarpment behind. Baden Hill Road is a quiet leafy lane flanked by trees and the well preserved stone walls of the churchyard (see figures 12 and 13) with their well designed modern memorial gates (see figure 14). This lane opens out to an overgrown quarry (see figure 15) and high land on one side which drops away to cottages and glimpses of open countryside beyond. Boyts Farm, set in a walled garden is further along the lane whilst glimpses of The Grange can be seen through the trees nearer the main road. This area is detached from the rest of the village and has a secluded, quiet atmosphere.
Figure 12: Baden Hill Road

Figure 12: Baden Hill Road

Figure 13: Baden Hill Road

Figure 13: Baden Hill Road

Figure 14: Memorial gates of church

Figure 14: Memorial gates of church

Figure 15: Overgrown quarry adjacent to Baden Hill Road

Figure 15: Overgrown quarry adjacent to Baden Hill Road

The somewhat isolated malting buildings can be reached along Duck Street (see figure 16). These are surprisingly large structures built of the typical brown Tytherington stone. The stream running beside the road at this point add movement and sound to this part of the Conservation Area.
Figure 16: Views looking south towards malting buildings.

Figures 16: Views looking south towards malting buildings.

Tytherington has had a varied economic history which is reflected in its diversity of buildings. The village retains much of its rural character enhanced by its setting of wooded slopes and vistas across the open countryside (see figure 17).
Figure 17: Views south from Baden Hill Road

Figure 17: Views south from Baden Hill Road

Summary map

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Contacts

The council is keen to work with the local community and other parties to help preserve and enhance this special area. If you wish to assist in any manner or have any further suggestions, please let us know.

For further information or advice please contact:

Conservation Officer
Strategic Planning Policy and Specialist Advice Team
South Gloucestershire Council
PO Box 2081
South Gloucestershire
BS35 9BP

Telephone: 01454 863578
Email: conservation@southglos.gov.uk